megan rosalarian gedris
minesweeperaddict:

So I picked this shirt out this morning without even remembering what was happening today, and when I did remember, it made me a little sad.
I discovered Rosalarian’s comics in early 2010, via some other webcomic I was reading at the time. The timing of this, for me, was particularly significant, because it had only been about a year (one long and confusing year) since I had begun to realize I was queer, still keeping that discovery from most everyone, including myself. All the depictions I could find of queer ladies didn’t seem to fit me, they seemed so… something outside of what I knew, in a realm that wasn’t mine. Where were the nerdy queers? Where were the stories I could relate to? I felt as if that identity couldn’t describe who I am.
I began reading Yu+Me and binged right through what the archives, absolutely adoring it. But what was there for me to do while waiting for new pages? I moved from there onto LPFOS. The loving homage to vintage cheesy sci-fi drew me in, the lovely and dynamic cast kept me reading. There were finally some queer stories I could truly enjoy, with characters that I, over time, have come to find relatable.
I won’t cry or say that some crucial part of my existence will no longer be around with this unfortunate happenstance, but I do want to make known my appreciation for works such as LPFOS. I can only hope there are other comics just as fantastic for me to come across in my web travels, that will be there to mean something to myself or others.
Thanks for this one, Rosalarian, and keep up the fantastic work with your other endeavors!

I accomplished what I set out to do then. Good. I can be satisfied. :)

minesweeperaddict:

So I picked this shirt out this morning without even remembering what was happening today, and when I did remember, it made me a little sad.

I discovered Rosalarian’s comics in early 2010, via some other webcomic I was reading at the time. The timing of this, for me, was particularly significant, because it had only been about a year (one long and confusing year) since I had begun to realize I was queer, still keeping that discovery from most everyone, including myself. All the depictions I could find of queer ladies didn’t seem to fit me, they seemed so… something outside of what I knew, in a realm that wasn’t mine. Where were the nerdy queers? Where were the stories I could relate to? I felt as if that identity couldn’t describe who I am.

I began reading Yu+Me and binged right through what the archives, absolutely adoring it. But what was there for me to do while waiting for new pages? I moved from there onto LPFOS. The loving homage to vintage cheesy sci-fi drew me in, the lovely and dynamic cast kept me reading. There were finally some queer stories I could truly enjoy, with characters that I, over time, have come to find relatable.

I won’t cry or say that some crucial part of my existence will no longer be around with this unfortunate happenstance, but I do want to make known my appreciation for works such as LPFOS. I can only hope there are other comics just as fantastic for me to come across in my web travels, that will be there to mean something to myself or others.

Thanks for this one, Rosalarian, and keep up the fantastic work with your other endeavors!

I accomplished what I set out to do then. Good. I can be satisfied. :)

Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space is gone now, but almost exactly an hour later I found out I am gonna be in Smut Peddler and it made me immensely happy!

Oh, and the music I was listening to, because it’s kind of hard to see, is the soundtrack to the musical version of Lesbian Pirates that will never see the light of day. I think that’s the part that made me cry. But now all I feel is hopeful about the future!

Well, nobody’s licensed this idea yet.

Well, nobody’s licensed this idea yet.

Wow, I was out of the house most of the day running errands and I come home to find such overwhelming support. Reading through the comments, recognizing some of these usernames from the comments section when issue 1 first went up. And knowing that my experiences are already being taken to heart as far as being a cautionary tale, well. It was a good ending to the day.

Some answers to questions I’ve been getting:

Lesbian Pirates is the only comic I’m taking off the web. My other comics are all entirely 100% owned by me, even the Filthy Figments stuff, so they will stay up for a long, long time and don’t worry about them going away.

I’m uploading zip files of all the comics to http://rosalarian.com/lpfoszips. It’ll take a bit of time for all of them to go up, but that’s where to check. Should all be up in a few hours. I have slow internet.

There are no print copies of the books. There haven’t been for the better part of a decade. You can occasionally find rare prints of the first initial run from back in 06-07, but buying them won’t give me any money. It also won’t give Platinum any money. So there’s that. Buying ebook versions gives Platinum money.

A lot of you are asking how you can give me some sort of money for doing this comic if books aren’t an option. My paypal is rosalarian@gmail.com if you’re inclined to “tip” me. Or, if you’re the type, now would be a nice time to try a subscription to Filthy Figments and read more of my comics.

Is there anything you can do? I’m not really sure. Platinum owns the rights fair and square, legally. They have so much bad publicity against them that I’m not sure if this would be more than a drop in the bucket. I’m mostly satisfied to know I’ve warned other people about them, and have cut ties with them.

Here’s a scene from that scrapped LPFOS musical I talked about. Music written by Corey Ruffin, who has since re-used the song as part of Super Happy Funtime. Which I actually get to sing in the show! So that’s cool. I like this song. I like singing it. I’m glad it didn’t have to die along with every other thing about this musical.

It’s with extreme sadness that I announce that my webcomic, I Was Kidnapped By Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space!!!, will be leaving the web in a week. It’s going to be taken down on November 5th. (Edit: to clarify, just this comic is going away. All my other comics are 100% owned by me and will stay up indefinitely. Just LPFOS is going down.)
This is by my own choice, a very difficult choice. As you may or may not know, the rights to LPFOS were bought by Platinum Studios in 2006. In the years since I first became involved with them, more and more of their shady practices have been revealed, to the point where I can’t be involved with them in any capacity anymore. I tried to get the rights back through many different avenues, but there is nothing I can do.
Right now, Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space is one of the comics Platinum is most proud of. They can show it off to investors as a success that they created, despite not doing a thing with the property except for one small print run 6 years ago. I have not seen a dime from them since 2007. Once the initial 6 issues they commissioned were over in 07, I was “allowed” to keep working on the series, which I did because I enjoyed the characters, but I received no payment. I received no support in any other capacity. I built the comic up by myself and with some gracious help from Hiveworks. Platinum Studios did nothing but hold it back. I had plans for a 4th and 5th arc of the comic, but ended the series this past January when I realized things with Platinum would never get better and as much as I loved these characters, I was being taken advantage of by continuing the series.
So I have to take it off the internet. I won’t let my work be used to boost the reputation of this slimy company even a little bit. I’d rather see it disappear. This decision was reached after more than a year of trying to salvage the pieces of this portion of my career, and several fits of crying until I’m too exhausted to get off the couch. I want to give you guys some time to say goodbye to it, read it one more time before it goes away.
I had great plans for it. I was hoping to print three TPBs so people could have the books in print form, and even redrew most of the first six issues in higher quality so the books would look so nice. The image above is one of the new covers I painted for one of the issues in the books. I had a script for an old-timey radio show a la Thrilling Adventure Hour. Oh, and I had a script for a full length stage musical, with a kickass composer lined up. He wrote two songs before everything imploded. These comprise a good half of my “secret projects” for the past two years that I was just itching to tell you all about, waiting for when the time would be right to reveal it. I guess everything comes out at a funeral. Again, all of these things were done without the help of Platinum. I flew out to California in 2011 for a meeting with them about these projects, which they were all gung-ho for when I was there, but once I was back home, all support was cut before it was anything more than a handshake.
I can’t help but feel so foolish. To have sold the rights in the first place, even if I was just a naive kid. To have let them blow smoke up my ass for years. To have ignored the scandals happening all around them, with so many other creators bringing grievances against them. To have continued the series for so long under such circumstances. To have held out hope I would be different and not get bit by this snake.
Young creators, please know that “getting published” is not the be-all-end-all of doing comics. There are so many people in this industry who will take advantage of your eagerness to be a “real comic artist.” Yes, you DO need a lawyer, I don’t care how must you trust that publisher, how big or small. Every contract, every time. Don’t sell something for what you think is a fair price. Know what the fair price is. Know what your value is. Know what the industry standards are. If you can’t get a good deal, don’t take a bad deal and hope for the best. Don’t take a bad deal and tell yourself it’s better than no deal at all. There are so many other avenues.
Well. That’s about it, folks. Thanks for reading, thanks for all the amazing fanart throughout the years, and the cosplay, and the lively discussions. If there’s one thing keeping me from regretting ever creating Susie and the gang, it’s you guys. I will always keep those good memories.

It’s with extreme sadness that I announce that my webcomic, I Was Kidnapped By Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space!!!, will be leaving the web in a week. It’s going to be taken down on November 5th. (Edit: to clarify, just this comic is going away. All my other comics are 100% owned by me and will stay up indefinitely. Just LPFOS is going down.)

This is by my own choice, a very difficult choice. As you may or may not know, the rights to LPFOS were bought by Platinum Studios in 2006. In the years since I first became involved with them, more and more of their shady practices have been revealed, to the point where I can’t be involved with them in any capacity anymore. I tried to get the rights back through many different avenues, but there is nothing I can do.

Right now, Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space is one of the comics Platinum is most proud of. They can show it off to investors as a success that they created, despite not doing a thing with the property except for one small print run 6 years ago. I have not seen a dime from them since 2007. Once the initial 6 issues they commissioned were over in 07, I was “allowed” to keep working on the series, which I did because I enjoyed the characters, but I received no payment. I received no support in any other capacity. I built the comic up by myself and with some gracious help from Hiveworks. Platinum Studios did nothing but hold it back. I had plans for a 4th and 5th arc of the comic, but ended the series this past January when I realized things with Platinum would never get better and as much as I loved these characters, I was being taken advantage of by continuing the series.

So I have to take it off the internet. I won’t let my work be used to boost the reputation of this slimy company even a little bit. I’d rather see it disappear. This decision was reached after more than a year of trying to salvage the pieces of this portion of my career, and several fits of crying until I’m too exhausted to get off the couch. I want to give you guys some time to say goodbye to it, read it one more time before it goes away.

I had great plans for it. I was hoping to print three TPBs so people could have the books in print form, and even redrew most of the first six issues in higher quality so the books would look so nice. The image above is one of the new covers I painted for one of the issues in the books. I had a script for an old-timey radio show a la Thrilling Adventure Hour. Oh, and I had a script for a full length stage musical, with a kickass composer lined up. He wrote two songs before everything imploded. These comprise a good half of my “secret projects” for the past two years that I was just itching to tell you all about, waiting for when the time would be right to reveal it. I guess everything comes out at a funeral. Again, all of these things were done without the help of Platinum. I flew out to California in 2011 for a meeting with them about these projects, which they were all gung-ho for when I was there, but once I was back home, all support was cut before it was anything more than a handshake.

I can’t help but feel so foolish. To have sold the rights in the first place, even if I was just a naive kid. To have let them blow smoke up my ass for years. To have ignored the scandals happening all around them, with so many other creators bringing grievances against them. To have continued the series for so long under such circumstances. To have held out hope I would be different and not get bit by this snake.

Young creators, please know that “getting published” is not the be-all-end-all of doing comics. There are so many people in this industry who will take advantage of your eagerness to be a “real comic artist.” Yes, you DO need a lawyer, I don’t care how must you trust that publisher, how big or small. Every contract, every time. Don’t sell something for what you think is a fair price. Know what the fair price is. Know what your value is. Know what the industry standards are. If you can’t get a good deal, don’t take a bad deal and hope for the best. Don’t take a bad deal and tell yourself it’s better than no deal at all. There are so many other avenues.

Well. That’s about it, folks. Thanks for reading, thanks for all the amazing fanart throughout the years, and the cosplay, and the lively discussions. If there’s one thing keeping me from regretting ever creating Susie and the gang, it’s you guys. I will always keep those good memories.

I worked on I Was Kidnapped By Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space!!! for 7 years, and now it’s done. And with the end of such a thing, there comes the introspection, the retrospection, and all other kinds of ‘spections. In this case, taking a look back to see just how far the art advanced in that time. I was so proud of the first page when I made it, and while I’m not ashamed of it now, I’ve certainly come a long long long way! So even if your art is shaky now, or at least not looking how you pictured it in your head, remember that with practice, you get better every day. Realize artistic talent is a learned skill that gets better with time. And then USE EVERY FIBER OF WILLPOWER TO NOT GO BACK AND REDRAW THE WHOLE FIRST HALF OF THE STORY!!!

duessadraws:

Well while I’m on space babes..

I threw my arms up and cheered when I saw this, for real. I love this!

duessadraws:

Well while I’m on space babes..

I threw my arms up and cheered when I saw this, for real. I love this!

Someone dies in today’s Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space, fulfilling the promise on the cover of this issue.

Someone dies in today’s Lesbian Pirates From Outer Space, fulfilling the promise on the cover of this issue.

You may have noticed how Alice and Betty never did get together before the comic ended and how Alice is kind of COMPLETELY in love with an actual ship instead.
I think audiences become accustomed to the idea that if they identify with a certain character, and that character spends enough time trying to romantically win over another character, they will be rewarded with that character’s love. This is such a pervasive thing in so much of our media, it’s rare to see a character we like end up alone at the end of a story.
Which to me is 1: boring as hell and 2: plays into real life ideas that real life people are entitled to real life other people just because they like them and are nice to them.  We’re all the heroes of our own stories, and being told over and over that the hero “gets the girl” so to speak, it’s no wonder people get downright angry when their affections are not returned. I know it’s not caused by media alone, and is more of an entire cultural system that’s been going for centuries and the media is merely a feedback loop/ method of perpetuation.
I know one small webcomic doesn’t really change that. But it just didn’t feel right to me to play into it without subverting it. As I was writing it, while I originally intended it to be a lot of comedic teasing before they eventually got together, the idea became less and less appealing to me. Alice was headed towards becoming a Nice Guy TM. Pining for this girl she’d put on a pedestal, never actually making a move, getting upset when Betty dated other women. And Betty just wasn’t interested in Alice, even though it “made sense” for them to get together. Betty might not have had good luck with the other girls she fell for, but that’s who she was attracted to. It didn’t really go completely over into Nice Guy territory, but I felt kind of weird when I realized that’s where things were headed, to where the audience is expecting it because we’ve all been taught that being nice to someone means you’re entitled to them.
When I decided not to have them get together, I wondered what then was the point of all the back and forth teasing that it would happen. I’m part of this culture, too, that says X + Y = Z, so if I don’t do Z, what was the point of mentioning X + Y at all? So many writerly advice essays I’ve read talk about not including a subplot if it doesn’t go anywhere. But I also like science, and if a theory says X + Y = Z, and you find a way in which X + Y = Q, you absolutely need to mention it. And writing advice is never set in stone.
It’s no secret that I’m not personally a fan of shipping. To me, I feel like a Nice Guy thinking that my own ideas of who belongs together are more important than the characters’ desires, or at least more important than the writers’. I know that’s not why everyone ships, but that’s what it makes me feel like when I think about shipping. I like characters to feel autonomous, I like characters with agency. I can wonder what it would be like if two characters got together, but demanding that they do, getting upset that they don’t, ignoring all the parts where the characters express who they do and don’t like because I think I know better than them makes me feel personally icky, makes me feel like I’m taking away their agency.
This is in no way meant to say that anyone who wanted Alice and Betty to get together was in any way bad. Of course you aren’t. I know it’s how many others choose to enjoy a story, and I did tease it rather heavily. But I think we take so much for granted in our stories, and I wanted to examine a piece of it.
~~~personal opinions on a story I wrote~~~

You may have noticed how Alice and Betty never did get together before the comic ended and how Alice is kind of COMPLETELY in love with an actual ship instead.

I think audiences become accustomed to the idea that if they identify with a certain character, and that character spends enough time trying to romantically win over another character, they will be rewarded with that character’s love. This is such a pervasive thing in so much of our media, it’s rare to see a character we like end up alone at the end of a story.

Which to me is 1: boring as hell and 2: plays into real life ideas that real life people are entitled to real life other people just because they like them and are nice to them.  We’re all the heroes of our own stories, and being told over and over that the hero “gets the girl” so to speak, it’s no wonder people get downright angry when their affections are not returned. I know it’s not caused by media alone, and is more of an entire cultural system that’s been going for centuries and the media is merely a feedback loop/ method of perpetuation.

I know one small webcomic doesn’t really change that. But it just didn’t feel right to me to play into it without subverting it. As I was writing it, while I originally intended it to be a lot of comedic teasing before they eventually got together, the idea became less and less appealing to me. Alice was headed towards becoming a Nice Guy TM. Pining for this girl she’d put on a pedestal, never actually making a move, getting upset when Betty dated other women. And Betty just wasn’t interested in Alice, even though it “made sense” for them to get together. Betty might not have had good luck with the other girls she fell for, but that’s who she was attracted to. It didn’t really go completely over into Nice Guy territory, but I felt kind of weird when I realized that’s where things were headed, to where the audience is expecting it because we’ve all been taught that being nice to someone means you’re entitled to them.

When I decided not to have them get together, I wondered what then was the point of all the back and forth teasing that it would happen. I’m part of this culture, too, that says X + Y = Z, so if I don’t do Z, what was the point of mentioning X + Y at all? So many writerly advice essays I’ve read talk about not including a subplot if it doesn’t go anywhere. But I also like science, and if a theory says X + Y = Z, and you find a way in which X + Y = Q, you absolutely need to mention it. And writing advice is never set in stone.

It’s no secret that I’m not personally a fan of shipping. To me, I feel like a Nice Guy thinking that my own ideas of who belongs together are more important than the characters’ desires, or at least more important than the writers’. I know that’s not why everyone ships, but that’s what it makes me feel like when I think about shipping. I like characters to feel autonomous, I like characters with agency. I can wonder what it would be like if two characters got together, but demanding that they do, getting upset that they don’t, ignoring all the parts where the characters express who they do and don’t like because I think I know better than them makes me feel personally icky, makes me feel like I’m taking away their agency.

This is in no way meant to say that anyone who wanted Alice and Betty to get together was in any way bad. Of course you aren’t. I know it’s how many others choose to enjoy a story, and I did tease it rather heavily. But I think we take so much for granted in our stories, and I wanted to examine a piece of it.

~~~personal opinions on a story I wrote~~~